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Friday, September 14th, 2012

Together for Adoption: resource links I promised this afternoon

This afternoon, I stood in front of everyone at the Together for Adoption conference and revealed my ignorance: sort of “What I didn’t know and there’s lot’s more besides.” There was so much to reveal I didn’t have time for it all, so here are links for anyone who wants more.

1. I owe tons of thanks to all my blog readers who helped me remember all I don’t know when you responded to my requests here and here. If you haven’t read through all those comments, I encourage you to take advantage of the glimpses these friends have given us into their homes.

2. As I said, my friend Dorothy Bode should have been up there with me, or instead of me. Some listeners probably agreed that it would have been less repetitive if she had been, so they wouldn’t have heard over and over, “As Dorothy told me”. . . . “As Dorothy said”. . . . I have no idea how the mother of 11 children with a houseful of hidden disabilities has time to write blog posts, and with pictures, but she does and it’s been an education for me. Dorothy’s blog. The post I quoted.

3. Three years ago I wrote a series of posts telling our adoption story. It begins here.

4. The letter Johnny wrote to me saying yes to our adoption.

Disrupting Grace: A Story of Relinquishment and Healing5. I quoted from Karen Richburg’s book, Disrupting Grace: A Story of Relinquishment and Healing.

 

 

When God Weeps6. Perhaps disability and orphan care are the most common topicsA Place of Healing: Wrestling with the Mysteries of Suffering, Pain, and God's Sovereignty on my blog. Joni and Friends is the organization that I’ve done a lot of volunteering for. I highly any of Joni’s books, written from the perspective of decades as quadriplegic.

 

The Connected Child: Bring hope and healing to your adoptive family7. Seems like RAD came into the list several times. So let me recommend Karyn Purvis’s The Connected Child: Bring Hope and Healing to Your Adoptive Family. This has become the prime resource for parents wanting to help their children with attachment and sensory difficulties. Actually, when Johnny and I read it together, we found much of it practical and helpful for general parenting.

You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!: The Classic Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder

8. Here are a couple of posts with suggestions for the person, like

Delivered from Distraction: Getting the Most out of Life with Attention Deficit Disorderme, with ADD. In particular, I hope the books might be helpful.

 

9. Oh yes. And pressure cooker. I thought it was a cool –I mean sizzling — image. But maybe only us pre-microwave era oldies knew what I was talking about.

Most of All, Jesus Loves You!Do You Want a Friend?Treasuring God in Our TraditionsFaithful Women and Their Extraordinary God

 

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Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

ADHD, audiobooks, and a review

For the month of July 2012 The Sword can be downloaded free from christianaudio.com.

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Boredom is a major roadblock to my getting done what needs to be done, especially the repetitive, mindless tasks like clearing my desk. Don’t tell me. I already know that’s not supposed to be repetitive, but what can I say?

Enter audiobooks. My smartphone becomes a distraction–I mean that in a good way. Following a good story keeps my mind off the pain of boredom. So I hardly realize I’m completing a dreaded, long-procrastinated job.

And yes, it’s stories that keep me going. I seem to need print in front of me to follow a non-fiction line of thought. But a good story helps me escape–I mean that in a good way. So I jumped at the opportunity to download and review The Sword, by Bryan M. Litfin, from christianaudio.

Whenever I read an author who’s new to me, I start cautiously, not knowing what to expect. But when the writing is good, I soon slip out of the role of observer and into the story. That didn’t take long in The Sword, especially because Ray Porter, the narrator, is amazingly good with individual, different voices for each character. Each voice remains consistent throughout the book, and goes a long way in portraying the personality of each person in the story.

I’m stumped trying to name the type of literature, the genre. Fantasy? Sort of, but it’s “real” people in our own world. Science fiction? Sort of, but only in that it’s set hundreds of years in the future. There is no science or technology. Allegory? Not really.

So I’ll just call it historical fiction set in the distant future. The setting is several hundred years from now after a raging virus and the resulting anarchy and war have wiped out most of humanity and our arts, accomplishments, and Christianity. The descendants of the survivors live in a world similar perhaps to the world of the Roman Empire, in the sense that there is an island of civilization surrounded by unknown wilderness peopled by scattered “outsiders” comparable to the barbarians in the lands surrounding the Romans.

In the book’s setting and heroism and drama, I felt a little like I was hearing the Stephen Lawhead I used to read to our boys, like the books in the Dragon King Trilogy (which are also available for download from christianaudio: In the Hall of the Dragon King and The Warlords of Nin and The Sword and the Flame).

The heart of the story is the reactions to the Old Testament that’s been discovered. The ones who are drawn to it recognize that this scripture is the way to know the true God who had been lost to them. So as we read/listen, we see them piecing together who he is–creator, sustainer, savior–and trying to figure out what that means in their lives. They know there’s some great significance to the ancient cross symbol, but with only the Old Testament, it’s still a mystery to them.

It seemed to me that reading about the experiences of these new followers of the true God might be a way of understanding better some of the dilemmas and fears of Christians in the unwelcoming world of the synagogue and the Roman Empire.

One small stumbling block to me was the accounts of the gatherings of believers and seekers. I thought the tone, language, agenda and format sounded too much like one of our contemporary churches or home groups.

But that anachronism was well-overbalanced by the stark realism when Elijah’s challenge to Baal is reenacted in a face-off with the evil “god.” I hardly knew whether or not I wanted God to show up in a fiery blast. I don’t want to give it away, but I was left, like the characters, wondering what his purposes are. That’s a good story. A good story that leaves the protagonists with no choice but launching out across glaciers into the unknown.

The end — of The Sword, anyway.

So I’m ready for the next two–The Gift  (at christianaudio) and The Kingdom  (at christianaudio)

 

 

 

 

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 This download was provided for review by christianaudio.com.

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Subscribe to NoelPiper.com by using the one of the Subscribe links to the right or by clicking here.

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If you make a purchase after you use an on-line shopping link in the sidebar at my travel blog, I receive a small commission, which costs you nothing extra. I recommend only items that I think will be of interest to my readers and that I probably have used personally or wish I did. 

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Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Stocking stuffers for the ADDer you love

If an ADDer has been ADDed to your life, here are a few stocking-stuffer type items for that person you love. Different ADD brains work different ways, but things like these are helpful to me. This is a short list, just what’s at the front of my brain at the moment.

Jumbo Carabiners Carabiner with Key Ring (Sold Individually)Carabiner key ring. This kind is even better than mine. I just have a plain ring and a cheap carabiner that I hang onto an outside loop on my purse (which means the ring could fall off the carabiner and be lost). Remember. Remember. Remember. Yes, I do have to remind myself to remember. But it’s pretty much a habit now, which is especially important in winter when there are way too many pockets to remember where I stashed my keys without thinking.

Moleskine Ruled Cahier Journal Kraft Large: set of 3 Ruled Journals

Journal. Once I realized I have ADD, a notebook became my almost constant companion. I “transcribe” conversations as they’re happening so I can remember and not misconstrue later. I jot down to-do’s and shopping lists–everything that I used to say “I’ll remember this later,” but didn’t. This size is the type I use. It’s large enough to scrawl more than one sentence on. It fits in the back pocket of my purse and weighs nothing to tuck under my elbow. On the light-colored cover, I can write the beginning date or info about what’s inside. Other styles will suit other people. There are a variety of sizes & covers.

Purse organizer. I’ve  stuck an insert into my purse with specific pockets for specific items, so I can reach in without looking and find my chapstick or lozenge or whatever. I scavenged my insert from a backpack I used to have, but this one here looks like it would be a good one. I wouldn’t necessarily choose pink, but hey, it’s down in the dark depths anyway.

“Magic” gloves. I don’t know how many pairs I have of those inexpensive one-size-fits-all gloves. But I don’t think it’s possible to have too many. Somehow, even if I think there’s a pair in every coat or jacket pocket and in all the sofa cushion cracks, still I’m looking for gloves when it’s time to walk out the door. So, lots of inexpensive gloves.

Master Lock 1523D Set-Your-Own Combination Lock, 2-5/16-InchCombination lock. One Noel ADD rule is: Arrange life so there are as few things as possible to hold onto within the brain. For me, one moment that particular rule comes into play is standing in front of the locker at the gym. I do not want the anxiety of mentally walking through every step that keeps me from locking the key inside the locker. I don’t need any extra hindrance to working out. My combination lock is a lot like this one–about the simplest kind possible. I never have been able to open the ancient-safe-door-ear-to-the-tumbler twirling number dial.

Apex Weekly Pill Organizer, Twice-a-Day, 1 Pill Organizer (Colors May Vary)Pill organizer. One of the facts of life for many of us is medicine and supplements that make life work better. One of the ironies of ADD is forgetting to take the pills that help control ADD. And if I do remember, the tedium of remembering which bottles and how many pills and of all that opening and counting and closing makes me think, “In a minute.” A minute which never comes. I’m a sucker  for organizers (forgetting for the moment that you have to keep on keeping them organized). But this pill box does help. I just fill it up once a week. The compartments are plenty large enough even for those monster fish oil capsules that are supposed to be helping my brain work better.  When I’m traveling I fill as many organizers as there are weeks of being away from home.

Due app. Even with the pill organizer, I do need to remember to take the pills. That’s where my  Due app has become one of my best friends. The kind of friend that won’t get off your back when you need a kick in the pants (or whatever mixed metaphor I mean). Due has too many good features for me to take time to list right now. Go to the Due website and see for yourself. I think it’s particularly for  iPhone  or  iPad.

Books. I have the impression there are lots more books about Adult ADHD than there were even a year ago. Of the ones I’ve read I’d say they all have pretty much the same basic info about ADHD. The main differences between books would be how they branch out from the basics. I especially appreciate the ones that come at it from a personal point of view. Beyond the official list of symptoms/characteristics, lightbulbs kept flashing on as I read stories of how ADD works itself in daily life and relationships. Here are a couple of books you might consider.

You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!: The Classic Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit DisorderYou Mean I’m Not Lazy, Stupid, or Crazy? The title alone sold me on this one. I’d say this one would probably appeal more to a woman with ADD than to a man.

 

 

Delivered from Distraction: Getting the Most out of Life with Attention Deficit Disorder Delivered from Distraction. If you were going to read just one book, I think this would be the one. (Just skip over the product promotion near the end of the book). Johnny and I read this one aloud together to try to grow together in our understanding of ADD.

 

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Additional gift ideas

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Disclosure: If you click on a link and purchase an item, I receive a small commission, which costs you nothing extra. I only recommend items that I think will be of interest to my readers and that I use personally or wish I did. 

 

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